Memory Book

Send us your memories here.

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Comments

  • Premier Cinema
    1st December 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cinemas

    What a great cinema the Premier was in the 60s. Saw lots of films here like Zulu, Bullitt, Jungle Book and the last film there was Kes the film by Ken Loach. Golden days. The Premier turned into a garage then a Muslim greengrocers which it still is today.
    Walter from Cheetham hill, now in Bury

  • craig
    29th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    Does anybody remember the pet shop and fishing tackle shop called Letty Cremners?

  • Mrs E Myers
    29th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I went to Thomas Street school, I was born in 1952 and lived my early years in Camp Street before moving to 49 Thomas Street Cheetham Hill. I remember going to this school before going on to North Salford Girls School on Leicester Road in about 1963/64. My maiden name was McNeil, many a happy time was spent playing in St Marks church yard, and does anybody remember the chicken place on St Marks lane near Cheetham Hill Road, we used to get the chicken feet to scare each other. I worked at Woolworths at the top of Thomas Street after leaving school. I also remembered Redmans and the Jewish bakery where we used to buy lovely warm begels on a Sunday, I also remember Madleys and Roy’s shop on Coke Street. Our neighbours opposite were Mr &Mrs Richardson, next door were the Dougans, up the Road lived a big family called the Welsbys. I can’t remember all the names we had some happy times and some awful times but I think it’s all part of growing up.

  • Ice Palace, Derby Street, Cheetham Hill
    27th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I remember going there Saturday mornings, often with my cousin. It was called the Silver Blades, I think, back then. I think I was about 7 years old when I started going, in 1959. My Mum used to take me on 2 buses, from Moss Side, where I lived. As I got a bit older, I used to go with my cousin. I spent most of my time outside school wearing roller skates, but always loved ice skating. I never had my own boots, just wore the ones that you could hire at the rink. People didn’t have much money in those days, and the boots were expensive. We moved to Brooklands near Sale when I was 10, and so it was too far for me to travel to. I started going to Altrincham Ice rink then.
    Elaine Savage

    • Ice Palace, Derby Street, Cheetham Hill
      27th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

      This brings back marvellous memories of my childhood, loving local to the Ice palace and going to cheetwood primary school and made class visits regularly to the ice palace to learn how to ice skate and nearly 50 years on I can still ice skate today.
      Philip Hardman

  • Ice Palace, Cheetham Hill
    14th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I remember seeing Georgie Fame and the Blue Notes play at the former Ice Palace in Derby Street, Cheetham Hill in the 196os
    Val

  • I used to live in Cheetham Hill, I lived at 61 Shirley Road, born in the house in 1962, lived there up to 1988 up to when my father died. He was Polish self employed builder John Walter Narloch, always had a sign in our front living room window advertising his business. Those were good days never had that family feeling anywhere else I have lived since. I went to King Davids School & left in 1979. Many happy days. The Woolworths was a major store on the high street, there were many shops, I remember the new shopping centre being built at the side of Woolworths it looked very modern big supermarkets cafes felt a world apart. We used to shop at a supermarket called Lennons I think every Saturday. Anyone out there lived on Shirley Road?
    Regards, Steve Narloch

  • Janice Firestone
    6th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    Our shop was next door to Bookbinders Bakery at 400 Cheetham Hill Rd. Elaine Bookbinder used to call in for sweets on her return from school, later became Elkie Brooks.

  • Paul moore
    19th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I used to live in Thomas St, Cheetham Hill. Our house was built on to the school. We were the Moore family. My gran lived with us, Mrs Nixon. I went to Thomas St and then Brentnall after Thomas St closed. We moved to Rainsough, Prestwich but remember my days in Thomas St. I remember Madeleys on Coke St and Roy’s next door, Woolworths on Cheetham Hill Rd, Mac fisheries opposite Watts paper shop. Thomas St school teachers were Miss Ridgeard, Miss Tress and Mrs Fisher – great days. I remember Baxters on William st. My aunty and uncle lived on William St – the Deans. The Beestons lived next door to them.

  • Diane Kosandiak
    16th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    The British Legion Club on Waterloo Road adjacent to Goldstone Gardens near Halliwell Lane. The club is long gone but the gardens remain although in much reduced circumstances.

    See photo here

  • Diane Kosandiak
    16th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    This row of shops is on Halliwell Lane opposite Goldstone Gardens. It used to be a special treat to have a burger and chips at the Progress Cafe.
    Kentons supermarket was on the same side a little further down Halliwell Lane and I remember a disabled old man used to sit on Kentons steps close to his blue invalid car.

    See photo here

    • Paul moore
      19th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

      Hi Diane. I remember playing in that park in the 60s with my cousins who lived on Halliwell Lane also the Moore family. Charlie was one of my dad’s brothers, his wife my aunty was called Hilda. Some of the children my cousin’s were Trevor Charlie Shirley Jenny. It was a really well kept park in them days, would have picnics also in Broughton park. Couldn’t have picnic in there now you’d be sharing your buttys with 20,000 pigeons!

  • CINEMAS IN CHEETHAM HILL, 1950S
    13th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cinemas

    We used to go to the cinema – The Shakespeare on Halliwell Lane, The Greenhill or The Premier on Cheetham Hill Road, The Temple near to Queens Road or The Odeon. There was another cinema called The Globe on Thomas Street, but I was never allowed to go there as it was known as “The Bug Hut”. Behind the Shakespeare Picture House was a large piece of rough ground, which I think was a bomb site full of broken bricks, slates and suchlike. We used to go and play there and play “house”, marking out the house and rooms with broken bricks. On one occasion I remember a boy throwing a flat piece of asbestos and it narrowly missed my eye. Imagine leaving asbestos there!
    Val M.

  • CHEETHAM HILL 1950s
    27th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I lived in Ollier Street from 1943 until 1956. Does anyone remember some of the shops in the area? On Highfield Street there was a pawnbrokers on the corner; a builders yard; a dispensing chemist; the Co-op Dairy (I still remember my mum’s divi number); Maguire’s drapery shop; Firth’s fish and chip shop; the Co-op grocery store. At the top of Highfield Street was a newsagents’ shop, and at the bottom on the corner was Gaffney’s hardware shop to where people carried their glass accumulators containing sulphuric acid (this was a source of power, like a battery) to work their wireless which had to be re-charged (no elf ‘n’ safety then!).
    Opposite Highfield Street, on Halliwell Lane at the corner of Greenland Street was Mawdsley’s greengrocers and wet fish shop; Milligan’s cake shop was at the corner of Ollier Street; and “Fred’s” grocer’s shop was across the road. On Oakhill Street at the corner of Greenland Street was Kissack’s sweet shop; on the other side at the corner of Alington Street was Malone’s grocery and sweet shop (I went in there to buy sweets for the first time after sweets came off ration and we didn’t have to produce our coupons); further up near Narbuth Street was another sweet shop. There was a bakery on Halliwell Lane near to Greenland Street and Oakhill Street; there was a spiritualist chapel “the tin chapel” on Halliwell Lane/Greenland Street; opposite at the corner of Marlborough Road was a tiny cobbler’s who used to have shoes stacked up very high – how he ever sorted them out I don’t know; nearby was the only telephone box which usually had a queue outside because nobody had a telephone.
    At the top of Heath Street, round the corner on Cheetham Hill Road was what I can only describe as a temperance bar called Lorenzini’s where we used to get penny glasses of Sarsaparilla or hot Vimto. On the opposite corner was another ice cream parlour – does anyone remember its name? There was a row of shops on Halliwell Lane between the Shakespeare cinema and Cheetham Hill Road – a hairdresser’s; Yaffe’s photographic studio and a bank on the corner. There always seemed to be a policeman on point duty at this junction.
    Does anyone remember the very disabled man who used to sit in all weathers on the kerb between the Shakespeare and the row of shops (opposite the bomb site) playing an accordion for coppers? He was a lovely man – I don’t know whether he’d been disabled during the First World War.
    On Cheetham Hill Road was a row of shops near to the bus stop. Ash’s wood yard was also nearby. There was also a Presbyterian Church, Sunday School and Billiard hall, then the Greenhill Cinema. The Premier cinema was opposite, with a further row of shops before Waterloo Road, which included a sweet shop (? Greeneps), a furriers, and an undertaker’s. Does anyone remember the huge open topped concrete “box” on the spare land between Waterloo Road and Halliwell Lane? I believe it was something to do with water storage during the war, but it was so high you couldn’t see inside it.
    Val M.

  • BROUGHTON HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS/SALFORD GIRLS HIGH SCHOOL
    25th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I went here and it was definitely Broughton High School for Girls. The original school, which I also attended before the move, was on the corner of Broom Lane on Bury New Road. Broughton High School for Girls should appear in the listing, strange that it doesn’t. I don’t know when it changed to Salford Girls High School but that is not how it started life.
    Carol Chapple

  • CROMWELL SECONDARY MODERN SCHOOL
    25th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    We lived in London St, right opposite but I went to Broughton High School for Girls and had to walk through all the boys going here to the bus stop wearing my grammar school uniform and beret or worse still, in the summer, straw hat. You can imagine the ordeal!
    Carol Chapple

  • LANGWORTHY ROAD SCHOOL, SALFORD
    18th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Salford places and streets

    I lived on Edmund Street, near Langworthy Road in the 1940s. During The Blitz, bombs blew out all the windows from Langworthy Road School and the surrounding houses. One bomb landed on Lower Seedley Road, where there are garages now, and a person was killed in the house. I was six at the time.
    Gordon Wilson, Salford

  • NORTH SALFORD SECONDARY SCHOOL
    18th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I was javelin champion at Salford Schools’ Sports Day 1962/63, when North Salford Secondary School took part in the event. It took place at Lower Broughton Road playing fields and my winning throw was 134 feet and seven inches. I also played for the school, city and county at rugby.
    Barry Bridgen, Salford

  • ST JOSEPH'S SCHOOL, ORDSALL
    18th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I went to St Joseph’s School, Ordsall. My dad and grandad went there as well. The pipe band wore orange kilts and green tunics. The drum major’s name was Whittaker. I lived in Tatton Street and Trafford Road. I remember Stanton’s Bakers on Tatton Street, next to St Joseph’s. Later on, my family moved to Little Hulton.
    Phil Knox, from Salford

  • LANGWORTHY ROAD SCHOOL, SALFORD
    18th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I went to Langworthy Road Infant School. The motto was ‘Integrity with Industry’ which was also Salford Council’s motto. It was written in the stained glass window and also carved into the stone.
    Gordon Wilson form Salford.

  • CLARENDEN SCHOOL SALFORD
    18th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I laid the first brick in the new Clarenden School in 1950/51. I was working for W. Fearnley & Son and I was still an apprentice.

    Gordon Wilson from Salford

  • Memories of Cheetham Hill
    8th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I lived on Bignor Street from 1941 to 1958. I went to Collegiate School on Brideoak Steet and used to come home for dinner through Bellott Street Park. I remember Classicks Sweet and Cigarette shop on Herbert Steet. I remember George Masons Grocer Shop on Waterloo Road and Bachmans restaurant and Leventons sweet shop, Sirottos the chemist and Klass Greengrocers and Issy Reece’s butchers and of course the Titanic Deli. Tobias bakery on the corner of Bignor Street sold bagels and the unbleached bread that we ate during the war. Heywood Street library supplied all my reading needs from the age of 5 and if I went missing the family knew to telephone there (we were the first family in the street to have a telephone installed in the house). The buses running on Waterloo Road at that time were the numbers 81, 78, and The 26. The Jewish Hospital was on Elizabeth Street and many an hour was spent in the outpatients there with scrapes and cuts. My husbands father had a raincoat factory next the Boots chemist for 20 years from 1945 to 1965. I had friends who lived in the prefabs in Heaton Park. I have many more memories, too many to write about here but would reading anything from anybody who lived locally during that time

    Brenda

    • bernie cohen
      24th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

      My father’s two sisters lived in Bignor Street in the forties, also my father’s sister-in-law had a sweet shop, I think it was called Sophie’s.
      My aunt was the recuzans not spent correctly.

  • ST LAWRENCE SECONDARY SCHOOL, SALFORD
    4th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I came from Peabody Infants School (Eccles New Rd) to St Lawrence’s in 1959. We were the first group of children. We were living in a terraced house with an outside toilet. It was amazing to see all the new facilities and the uniforms. The teachers were pleasant (initially), until they got to know us. I personally got in a lot of trouble at school, as i was dyslexic and this wasn’t recognised then and I rebelled. I left when i was 14. I was expelled 3 times. Mr Rice the art teacher was brilliant, he was patient.
    Barbara Bentham

  • ST LAWRENCE SECONDARY SCHOOL, SALFORD
    4th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    It opened in October 1959. Three primary schools combined to send pupils there. All Saints (Weaste), St Lukes (Liverpool St),St James (Salford Precinct). It was the first catholic secondary school in Salford. There were forty kids to a class. The music teacher used to play Miles Davies songs and classical music.
    George Dawes

  • ORDSALL SECONDARY MODERN SCHOOL, SALFORD
    4th September 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    We used to sit and play on the peacock sculpture, it was situated in the grounds of the school, it was outside near the front doors of the school. The community police used to chase us away.
    Janice

  • 31st August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Work and Industry

    My mum, Jean McDonald worked at Stone Dry in 1971/72, she was Jamaican. Does anyone remember an Asian man called Billy who worked there in the leather section of the factory?

  • WHIT WALKS, CHEETHAM HILL, 1950s
    21st August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Whit Walks

    We looked forward to Whit Week as this was when we got a complete set of new clothes When friends or relatives saw you in your new clothes they usually gave you a small amount of money. Other than this we didn’t have an awful lot of clothes bought during the year. I went to St Mark’s School on Heath Street and I can still picture a lot of teachers and I was confirmed at St Mark’s Church, but I would never walk in the Whit Walks. We used to go and watch the “scholars” as the Whit walkers were sometimes referred to. The Whit Walks were in two parts-the Protestants walking on Whit Monday and Catholics walking on Whit Friday. We always had “shakers” (paper strips on a stick). After the Walks we usually went up to Heaton Park.
    MM

  • Hutch
    19th August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I lived in Hightown, Sycamore St and I also remember Rose’s on Cheetham Hill Rd. If you couldn’t offord a packet of cigerettes she’d sell you one for 2d.
    Anybody remember Sadie’s chip shop on the corner of Elm & Herbert Street, a brisket sandwich and a gherkin Half a Crown, you could also get a good nosh at Cadens chip shop in Vernon Street. Happy days.

  • 16th August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    My mother’s family, (Goodman), came to the Cheetham Hill area of Manchester in the early 1900s from Poland, and lived in Elizabeth Street/ Julia Street areas before moving to Bignor Street (l think it was number 72 but not certain) at the bottom of Cheetham Hill Road. My uncle, my mother’s brother, (Benny Goodman) went off to fight the facists in the Spanish Civil War in the late 1930s. He later returned and served in the 1939-45 War and after the War had a clothes shop on Cheetham Hill Road. I remember visiting this area of Manchester in the mid 1960s and occasionally drive through the area now but much changed.

  • I can remember lots of the shops from the early 60s in Cheetham Hill when i was only 3 or 4 years old. My dad used to take me and my brothers into Lees butchers at the end of Back St Marks Lane(or Street). They always used to slice off a piece of vorsht for us kids to have. I can also remember cry clearly, Rosie Gottlieb who ran a sweet and wine shop on Cheetham Hill Rd, it was just up from the library and there was a stone step outside. She had red hair and always had a whitish foundation on her face. To this day, i still laugh remembering my late dad saying “she had a face like a floured bap”!
    Steven

  • SALFORD SCHOOLS
    5th August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    I went to Clarendon Park High School from 1974 to 1979 having first been at New Windsor C of E on Cross Lane.I loved both New Windsor and Clarry school. I remember our dinner ladies at Windsor Mrs Ash, Mrs Coffey and Miss Almond my infant teacher. She later married Mr Russell who became head there after Nobby Vernon.
    At Clarry Miss Eleanor the head of English was my favourite ever teacher. She was stern until you were in her class then it was great fun. Every kid in her class always got o level grade c minimum. Other teachers were Mr Healy PE, Mr Sweeney PE, Mr Redgate Geography, Mr Murray Maths, Mr and Mrs Lindoe Maths, Mrs Morris French and Mrs Powell art. In our first year our English teacher was Mr Fielding who was related to Keith Fielding of Salford rugby fame. Great times and great friends. I even married a girl from my class in 1983…

  • Derby Street Memories
    31st July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    I worked in the office of the Talmund Torah, on Bent Street, off Derby Street. All the synagogues were down there. There was a youth club called the Study Circle run by Dr. Zlotkis’ daughter Rose Zlotkis. Dr Zlotkis was head of Jewish Education and so was his son Judah Zlotkis. I got married in 1951. I remember Britstones shop near Derby Street too. Everyone was more friendly then as they lived new each other, and had no TV or phones.

    Nita Rappaport

  • Goodmans Chippy, Brunswick Street
    31st July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    Goodmans Chippy, Brunswick Street, was run by my Grandparents, Annie and Wolfie Goodman. Everyone used to go in it, it was well known. My sister was born in 1954 and they still had it then.

    Karen Wingate

  • Jewish Schools Canteen
    31st July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Schools

    My Mother ran the Jewish Schools Canteen next door to the Rialto, Higher Broughton. They prepared dinners for Jewish boys and girls.

    Lillie Bialich

  • Cinema Memories
    31st July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cinemas

    I used to live on Simons Street, near Heaton Street, Higher Broughton. I remember the Shakespeare Cinema and the Devonshire Cinema, on Devonshire Street. We used to go to the kids matinees – Batman and Superman! We also went to the County Cinema on Saturday morning – Hopalong Cassidy! Then in the afternoon we went to the Rialto!We also regularly went to the County Cinema, for Saturday Matinees.

    David Bialich

  • Does anyone remember jumping down the long steps outside the Papermakers in Higher Broughton and swinging on the metal bar around the side. We would bet who could jump down the most sets of steps. Wonder we didn’t break our necks or at least our legs.

    • Peter Sewell
      13th August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Comment Category: Salford places and streets

      Yes I remember it well I have a photo of the papermakers and a few of the coronation party in Conway St , with all the kids Dave & John Moron , Phil Barrett , Henry Dear , Tony & Frances Mottram , also one taken from Duncombe St showing Fenny St , and the top of Conway St , and one taken from the top of Conway St showing the garages at the bottom , I have one of your sisters wedding with your family on it and a few of mine . If you would like copies I could e-mail them to you

  • I have moved too many times in my life to say that I ‘belong’ anywhere but I was born in Salford, and my earliest memories are from there. The streets were cobbled, and in the summer, all the radios in our street were tuned to the same radio station. As I walked to the toffee shop on Garnet street, I would hear ‘Shrimp Boats are a Coming, There’s Dancing Tonight’ coming out of every hall and window. I remember lots of people in uniforms, and a community spirit that seems to be gone. And a world without drugs. Please look at my book on my website. It is best on a large screen, impossible on a mobile phone. http://www.wayne.cz

  • MIGRATION FROM AUSTRIA, CHEETHAM TOWN HALL
    13th July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    I came here to Cheetham Hill on 1st June 1952, as a nanny, from Austria. I was twenty two years old at the time. Wedding receptions were often held at Cheetham Town Hall in those days and you could do your own catering , which was common. People bought their own food. Not many people had transport then, so they had to travel to markets to buy it.
    Margaret

  • WHIT WALKS, CHEETHAM HIIL, 1950s
    13th July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Whit Walks

    I used to watch the Whit Walks go by on Cheetham Hill Road. It took two hours. My eldest daughter was christened at St Lukes Church. The alter was blue and gold, the rector used to march with us. The sunday school teacher was called Mrs Stephens, she was a very strong character.
    Margaret

  • MIGRATION FROM THE UKRAINE
    6th July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    My mother came from The Ukraine as little girl about 1908-1910, during what we call the first wave of Ukranian migration. My father’s father came from Czechoslovakia. My parents were married at St Casimirs, on Rochdale Rd or Oldham Rd, which was a church shared by Ukrainian, Lithuanian and Polish people. I married a Ukrainian man after the war, he worked in Failsworth.
    My fathers family were tailors, they lived near the Odeon, on Cheetham Hill Rd. There were six large three storey houses with cellars, the address of my families tailors was no 235 Cheetham Hill Rd. The business was run from the house, they all sewed in the house. They were private tailors, who also also made clerical clothes for the priests, dress coats. They also made tail suits for the dancers which were highly specialist items. My uncle was a dance teacher at Finnigans Dance School, his name was Joseph Zawalinsky.
    Irene Karpluch (previously Kowalski)

  • ITALIAN MIGRATION
    6th July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    I came to England on September 9th 1954. The next year I was May Queen at the Italian Whit Walks and we set off from St Michaels Church in Ancoats.
    Angelina

  • MIGARTION FROM THE UKRAINE
    6th July 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    I came to England in 1946 with my mother when I was seven. I didn’t have to register right away because I was a child. I later paid five shillings for my registration card, which I got on 15th July 1955, when I was sixteen. I originally came to Longtown, Cumbria (a displaced persons camp). We came to England via Italy. My mother had been sent to work in Austria, labouring on a farm (under the German occupation of the Ukraine), many women were sent away during this period and I went with my mother, to Spital , Austria. The German army came to our house in The Ukraine and if you had three kids, two had to leave to work for the Germans. I went into Kindergarten as I was only twelve months old. The work was extremely hard for my mother on the farm, as there was no pay and the food was very poor. We lived in separate quarters. I stayed with my mother in Austria and after the war until we were sent by the allied army to England.
    I stayed in Longtown (Cumbria) for ten years (1946-1956) and then went to Ashton (Greater Manchester). All my family were moved to different parts of The Ukraine during the war. I met my husband in Longtown, he had also come from The Ukraine. I’m now seventy eight years old.
    Anna Rewko

  • CHEETHAM HILL, 1950s

    Many people will remember the iconic Woolworths building in Cheetham Hill village and also Bata shoe shop, which was near it. There was also the Premiere Cinema and The Odeon further down towards Queens Rd, also known as the ‘Rivera’.
    Terry

  • Linda Eastham…My Dad died at the opening of Gt. Clowes street warehouse…August 5th 1970. He was with my sister who was seven at the time. There is a book in Waterstones with the picture in it. Also I saw it on the internet…I went to St. Andrews..Tetlow lane…left in 1966….my name was Kathleen Phelan..now Beckett…

  • HIGHTOWN, 1950s
    13th June 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

    My mother and father lived in Hewitt Street, Hightown in the 1950s. They lived in Red Bank before that and in between they lived in Bellot Street( also Hightown), off Heywood Street. The grocers shop on Heywood St was called Stalberg’s, (at no 80 Heywood st), it was always very busy.
    Sheila Harris (formerly Friedlander)

  • WHIT WALKS, CHEETHAM HILL, 1950s
    9th June 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Whit Walks

    My family made shakers (paper strips on a stick), for the whit walks when they lived off Cheetham Hill Road. They sold them in different towns. They also made flags for football matches. They boiled fish glue to stick to the shakers and it stunk the house out. My grandad, auntie and uncle all made them. They also bought crape paper and cut it into strips for the top part of the shakers.
    Eddie

  • CROSS LANE MARKET, SALFORD

    I remember the smell of Cross Lane Market, the fruit and fish. I remember the cafe for the bus men upstairs and people could go in downstairs. The 71 or 70 bus route went past it.
    Paul

  • CHEETHAM HILL AND HIGHTOWN, EARLY 1950s and 60s

    When I started work at Timpsons (shoe shop) on Cheetham Hill Rd I got £1.75 a week. I was 15 years old, you could buy a blouse for 2/11. They closed on Wednesday afternoons. We worked all day Saturday. I only worked there a couple of years and then I got a job in mail order after that which I loved. Everyone got on in the area, it was mostly Jewish. They later changed the name of my street, Chestnut Street, to Citroen Street when we lived in it(in the 1960s)
    Estelle

  • PEA SOUP FOG, CHEETHAM HILL, 1940s

    I lived on Chestnut Street, next to Bignor Street, Hightown (near Cheetham Hill). I remember The Odeon Cinema, The Temple, The Premiere and The Shakespeare. We went on a Saturday morning. One night my mum had taken me to The Temple Cinema and when it ended you couldn’t see your hand in front of you in the evening. The film finished about 10.30pm and we got home at 11.20pm (normally a ten minute walk). When we came out it was at Bellot Street Park (near Bignor Street). My brother had come out looking for us.
    Estelle Szablinskyj

  • MIGRATION FROM THE UKRAINE TO CHEETHAM HILL
    1st June 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    When I arrived we used to have police registration books, we had to report if we moved house, school or jobs within 24 hours. The police used to check on us because we came as refugees or displaced persons.
    Anna Rewko

  • MIGRATION FROM THE UKRAINE
    1st June 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    When I came to live in Ashton from The Ukraine we went to Cheetham Town Hall for dances and to St Chad’s to go to mass. When I came here I was seven. I lived in Scotland (on the borders), then in 1956 I came to Ashton. Iv’e been coming to The Ukraine Centre in Cheetham Hill since 1956. My children and my grand kids all speak Ukrainian. My son is secretary of the Ukrainian Association in Ashton and now he is the Chair of The Ukrainian Association of Great Britain.
    Anna Rewko

  • ITALIAN MIGRATION AND CHEETAHM TOWN HALL
    1st June 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Migration memories

    I came to Manchester when I was 25, to Cheetham Hill. It was a big change from Italy. I worked as a domestic for a Jewish family for 4 years. The Italians used to use Cheetham Town Hall for dancing and special occasions, like weddings. There was a dance hall upstairs.
    Angelina Ostafijczuk

  • DANCE HALLS IN THE 1950s
    25th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Dance Halls

    I learned the Quick Step, The Fox Trot, Waltz and Jive (I had to learn how to Jive). I started going in 1948 and by 1950 I was travelling all over Manchester, to The Ritz, The Plaza, Levenshulme Palais and Belle Vue. I also went to Sale Lido and The Sale Locarno. There was another dance hall in Oldham Rd called The Salon, it was a lovely place. I also went to Oldham, there were a couple of dance halls there aswell. I went to Hammersmith Palais. London was the place for dancing, Hammersmith Palais was my favourite. They had famous singers who had come onto the music scene.

    Bernard

  • BAND LEADERS
    25th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Dance Halls

    Joe Loss was a famous band leader. He used to play ‘In The Mood’ at The Hammersmith Palais in the 1960s.
    Jackie Harrison

  • DRESS MAKING
    25th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: General memories

    My mum was a fabulous dress maker. She always made sure we had a new outfit for main festivals such as Passover and Jewish New Year (Rosh Hashana).
    Jackie Harrison

  • TEXTILES COMPANIES, CHEETHAM HILL
    25th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Work and Industry

    There were many textiles companies in the Cheetham Hill and Broughton area of Salford in the 1950s and 60s. They included Cohen and Wilks (Cheetham Hill). CWS Ladies Tailoring (Lower Broughton), Stone Dry ( Broughton Lane) and i’m sure many others. My grandmother worked at Stone Dry, as a cleaner and my mother worked for many firms, often as an outdoor machinist, many were family owned. These are just a few.
    Laurence

  • Julie Anne Ratcliffe
    18th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Comment Category: Work and Industry

    I would love to know how many textile companies there were in the 1950’s in Cheetham Hill and who owned them.
    My mum who has now passed away, spent an inordinate amount of time in the area. She spent many a Saturday night at the Ritz Night club and she also bought fabrics from the Jewish traders for her dress making business in the day.

  • john catterall

    as a proud Whit Laner l applaud this site and will be back to edit my memories and enjoy the site

  • Waterloo Rd

    I used to live in Cheetham Hill many years back and I’m interested in finding out about the history of Waterloo Rd Cricket ground and what was there before it if anyone remembers? Some one told me there it used to be a graveyard but I’ve never been able to confirm it.

  • Norma Harris

    My mother was a raincoat machinist who worked in camp street. Remember visiting the factory. She did piece work which meant she was only paid for the raincoats she made. My grandfather lived in Mary Street Strangeways in a back to back. My Bobby had 11 children and never spoke any English only Yiddish. Memories of going to Uncle Morris factory in Hightown. Made plastic raincoats.We used to go to the cinema in Cheetham Hill , the Premier and also every Saturday we went to the Temple cinema to meet boys.

  • RED BANK

    Lord street went from Red Bank to Strangeways Prison. My father was born in the area. My great grandfather Abraham also lived there, he had a horse and cart and sold fruit and veg. He also did house clearances in the 40s and 50s.
    Eddie

  • Lived I Hightown from being a baby, my first job leaving school was Boots the Chemist on Waterloo Rd . I was paid £3. 10 shillings per week, and what I did with that money, you wouldn’t believe !!. After paying my “Keep”, I had the grand sum of £1,10 shillings and still managed to save !!. My nana lived on Peter St and worked at the Butchers on Garnett St, my Grandad worked for Serettis ice cream and my mum worked for Eva Weston, who had the clothes shop next to the Butchers where Nana worked . I remember the wet fish shop at the bottom end of Garbett St, where we used to try and smuggle a piece of ice off the stall to suck on, even though it smelt and tasted of fish . So many beautiful memories , I’m so grateful we were young then ❤️

  • CHEETHAM HILL RD, 1950s
    30th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Hempling shop was situated at 303 Cheetham Hill Road, it was a drapery shop. My uncle Ralph Levene had it, I lived in Huxley Avenue near the Temple Cinema in the 40s and 50s. We lived behind the shop in the 40s. My dad, Rueben Hempling owned it then. I also rememeber Feingolds shop on Cheetham Hill rd.

    Adele Bergman

  • THE CO-OP
    17th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My mother used to send me shopping (it included 1Ib of biscuits). On the way home i used to try samples of them just to make sure they were any good (my mother didn’t mind). You had to give your dividend number. The butter was prepared and served in slabs using old scales and blue bags. Everything was weighed out. The cheese was weighed out in blocks.
    Jackie Harrison

    • bill thomason
      18th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi, I remember the co-op well (with affection). My Mum`s favourite branches were on Great Cheetham Street, somewhere opposite the County cinema & Wellington Street, near Saint John`s church, her “Divi” number was 19436, that number must have meant something to me, it has been in my head from being a child, to now being 70.
      The Co-op building on Wellington Street is still there, with its corner tower, check it out…a lovely building, with the surrounding houses having matching brickwork!
      Bill.

  • FINNIGANS DANCE HALL
    17th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    A friend of mine won cups and medals at Finnigans Dance Hall. She lived in Heywood Street. Her name is Angela Bloom.
    Eddie

  • HIGHTOWN, 1960s
    17th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Hightown was demolished from the mid 60s to late 60s. Alot of people went to Hulme and some to Hillock in Whitefield. They started a synagogue in Hulme and Hillock.
    Eddie

  • bill thomason
    11th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Hi, again. As a child I lived at Great Clowes St; Higher Broughton, next to Duncan St; and I have fond memories of all the “posh” cars (Austin “Princess”,Rolls Royce,Bentley) that were parked in Duncan St; whenever there was a Jewish wedding at the Synagogue. During the 50s when I was aged about 6-7 this was SO unbelievably exciting because there were hardly any cars in the area, so, when there was a wedding, the whole of Duncan St; was filled……a true spectacle in its day!
    (anybody got a photo of the Synagogue ?)
    Thanks for your time.

    • michael walker
      18th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Comment Category: Cheetham Hill and Hightown

      I lived on Duncan street and remember the weddings at the synagogue during the1950s . We lived opposite the synagogue and in a large rundown house owned by my grandfather Sam Goodwin.the house was big and the extended family amounted to twelve people three dogs two cats a horse chickens and a loft of racing pigeons.

  • bill thomason
    11th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    In the early 60s-70s I worked at S.Maurice & co; 268 Bury New Rd;
    facing “Nunns” garage & the back gate was on Back Roman Road.They were button manufacturers & dyers,my job was as a dyer.
    It is now (and has been for a while) a car showroom.
    Does anybody remember it ? Anyone got a photo ?
    They supplied all the local “rag trades” with buttons,buckles & slides.
    On a Friday I would finish at 3.30pm then pop into the Papermakers arms, the Landlord was called Walter.
    Take care.

  • THE RITZ IN THE 1960s
    10th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The bands playing at The Ritz in the 1960s were Phil Moss and The Charley Bassett Trio. These were two of the regular bands when I was 19 in the 60s. The stage revolved to the tune of ‘Lonely Lady.’ We honed our dancing skills there. My mum taught me to dance when I was young.
    Jackie Harrison

  • MEMORIES OF TRAFALGAR STREET, LOWER BROUGHTON
    2nd April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember two girls called the Baron twins, we were friends with them. Eva Simons, my Mother, moved to Trafalgar Street around 1945 to 1946. I later remembered the Franks family who used to deliver Tizer and orange juice to our street, and someone who delivered fish called Abe Fischer.

    Harvey Goldstein

  • LOWER BROUGHTON, 1950s
    2nd April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The first TV in the street was bought by my Mother in 1953 and the whole street queued up to see it.
    Graham Kraft

  • MEMORIES OF SHOPS IN HIGHER BROUGHTON
    2nd April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I lived in Marlborough Road in the 1950s and 60s. I remember Klapish Newsagents and Levy’s Butchers on St. James Road. My parents lived on Hewitt Street, Hightown,

    Shiela Harris (Freelander)

  • MEMORIES OF INDOOR MARKET, CHEETHAM PARADE
    2nd April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember working the indoor market when I was 16. I remember Fine Fayre Supermarket, Shoppers Paradise, Black Forest Cafe, The Laughing Lentil, Pandoras Box, George Glass and Lindy Lou’s.

    Donna

  • MEMORIES OF SALFORD IN THE 1950s AND 60s.
    2nd April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My Mother had a fruit shop on the corner of Melbourne Street and Bramley Street from the 1920s (with my two Uncles Isaac and David Cohen). They had the shop until the mid 1960s. Years later they worked Cross Lane and Bury Markets. My Mother used to serve the wrestler Giant Haystacks.

    Harvey Goldstein

    • Faradeeba Butt
      1st June 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I lived on Tenerife Street and used to be sent to the fruit shop in Bramely Street.
      There used to be a poultry supply shop on the corner of Tenerife St at The Bury New Road end.
      My father was the second Asian to open a continental food store on Waterloo Road.
      I attended Cheetham Primary School in the mid 60s till 1970.

  • MEMORIES OF BARROW HILL?
    29th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Does anybody remember the prefabs on Barrow Hill Rd Cheetham in the late 1940s/early 50s?

  • CHEETHAM INDUSTRIES
    23rd March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I worked for Jack Meek’s on Derby Street, they made raincoats, I worked in the offices. My first job was at Manchester Metal Works Auto Office, on the switchboard, copy typing. George Van Colle was the owner.
    Sandra Silver

  • HIGHTOWN MEMORIES
    23rd March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I lived on Hewitt Street in Hightown. Other streets in the area were Maple street, Chestnut Street, Lime Street, Sycamore Street, Birch Street, Larch Street etc.The ice cream shop there was called Sorettis and the ice cream had proper ice in it then, it was proper ice cream, it wasn’t fatty like it is now.
    Sandra Silver

    • Lynn Eastham
      24th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi
      I lived in Charlotte Street and remember Jack Olivers, the green grocers Dolly Taylors the Off Licence. Everybody went to Sorettis it was the best ice cream around. My brother James was in the Scouts off St James Road.
      Would love to hear from anyone else who lived in Charlotte Street

      • Angela fisher
        25th August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

        I lived in Charlotte Street. In 1962 they were demolished and I went to live in the flats on Silk Street

      • Rick Wallwork
        12th October 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

        Comment Category:

        Hi Lynn, I lived in Garnett St from 1941 until 1960 and knew Charlotte St. very well. In fact one of the Olivers sons now lives in Spain I was in contact with him sometime ago. Did you go to Garnett St or Marlborough Rd. School. ?
        Best Wishes Rick Wallwork

  • CHEETHAM HILL MEMORIES
    23rd March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Mackey Davies was a very well known barber in the Cheetham Hill area and everyone went there. He was a former boxer and was also a friend of my dads.
    Jackie Harrison

  • MIGRATION TO CHEETHAM HILL
    23rd March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My grandmother came from Poland at the turn of the last century. She lived on Elizabeth Street, Cheetham and before that on Julia Street in the Strangeways area. They had a milk shop there and the milk was measured out. When I was ten she used to say “get me a soda syphon from Boots Chemist on Waterloo Rd,” she would also say “Our Jackie, get me a pound of marie broken biscuits”. My grandparents on my mum’s side were from Lithuania.My father was a joiner and cabinet maker in Cheetham Hill, he worked with his brother.
    Jackie Harrison

  • REGENT ROAD, SALFORD
    13th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    When the ships came in the sailors from South Africa came into my shop on Regent Road and bought shopping trolleys, ironing boards, coffee table etc., which they took back on the boat with them to South Africa, the West Indies and so on. They also bought scatter cushions and washing powder.

    Eddie

  • HALIWELL LANE, CHEETHAM HILL
    13th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    There was a wash house on Halliwell Lane, Cheetham Hill. We lived also lived on Haliwell Lane and then moved to Peru Street and then to Queen Street. I remember Bert’s Shop, it was a corner shop and it sold everything.

    Paulette Holness

  • WATERLOO ROAD
    7th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember a sweet shop on Waterloo Rd called Leventon’s, they sold jars of sweets. It was opposite Boots the chemist. I also remember Tobias the bakers on Waterloo rd, where they sold chopped herring and liver.
    Sheila Harris

    • Barry Davidson
      7th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I was interested in reading your comments about Tobias the Bakers on Bignor St. My uncle Jack was married to Lily Tobias one of Abe Tobias daughters.
      He owned greyhounds and raced them at the Manchester dog tracks. As he had limited movement and was a large man my mother used to accompany him to the tracks to place his bets! Happy days!
      Barry Davidson

  • CWS LADIES TAILORING, LOWER BROUGHTON
    6th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I worked at CWS ladies tailoring on Trafalgar st Lower Broughton. I started in 1955 and stayed for about 3 years. I became an approved apprentice and went on Piecework. Mrs Roberts was our Fore lady, she was terryfying. It was a massive building over 3 floors. I heard about 700 people worked there. Mrs Warton taught us how to make ladies coats. There were 3 stages, first the top coat, which included pockets. Then the linings and then the bagging out, where they put the lining and the collar together.

    Jean Edwards

    • Edna Challender
      23rd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I worked at coop trafalgar st I learnt how to make a coat /suit from a bundle my teacher were miss Wharton we did 12 month learning then on to piece work to earn your own money my learning wage were £3/43p 7 30 am to 5 30 pm

    • Julie Anne Ratcliffe
      18th May 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Who owned the ladies coat business?

  • COKE STREET, CHEETHAM HILL, 1950s
    5th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    There was a shop called The Meadow in Coke Street that delivered milk. The owner had a stable there, he had regular orders, he’d dip the ladle in the churn and he left a white enamel milk jug ( or a pot one), which was left on the step-he came door to door early in the mornings. People left the milk money under the jug early in the mornings. It was a hotch potch of houses on Coke Street.

    Jean Edwards

    • I was born on Coke Street in 1953 , although where we lived was down an ally way so our postal address was Back Coke Street . We got moved out to kersal flats about 1960 .

    • Pam
      7th March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Our family had the off-licence on the corner of Coke Street and St Marks Lane, we left in 1958 and moved to Shirley Road. I have many happy memories of growing up there and playing out, there was a real community feel in the area.

  • ADELPHI LADS CLUB, SALFORD
    23rd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember The Adelphi Lads Club, Salford on Thursdays as it was Girls Night. I remember when they put the price up and I said to Lofty who ran it, “do you really have to put it up half a pence”? Lofty used to cycle everyhwere.
    Jane Hamilton

    • Bill Hamilton
      26th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I was a member of the Lads Club and I remember Lofty very well.
      Was in a pub years later (The Broughton Tavern) on Blackfiars Rd at a wedding and who was I sat with, you have probably guessed it, Lofty.

  • MIGRATION MEMORIES, CHEETHAM HILL
    23rd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Bata Shoes in Cheetham Hill, it as a Czech Company. I originally came to Manchester from Czechoslovakia in 1939 as a child. I first came to London, then to Manchester. I lived in Manchester from 1956 and I remember Cheetham Hill Road and shops like Woolworths, Bata Shoes etc
    Paula Rabinowitz

  • TRAFALGAR STREET, LOWER BROUGHTON, 1950s
    23rd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember the night watchman who worked at the Co-op factory on Trafalgar Street. He bred bull dogs. As a kid we were all frightened of him. We sometimes used to sneak in the factory and go up the stairs.
    Eddie

  • HIGHTOWN, 1950s
    23rd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I used to walk down to The Maypole Shop and buy a bag of broken biscuits for a shilling and walk back through the entry and eat the chocolate ones when I lived on Vernon Street, High Town. The Maypole Shops were very popular then.
    Eddie

  • HIGHTOWN, 1950s
    23rd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Simkins fish and fruit shop at 23 Garnett St. I also remember two sisters who had a shop on Garnett Street called Brodkins shop, where I bought fireworks like penny bangers, pin wheels and rip-raps.
    Eddie

  • Sewing Machine Shops, Cheetham Hill
    20th February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My mother and gran worked in machine shops in Cheetham Hill and Collyhurst. At the time my mother was living in Whitely Street, Collyhurst. When she was working in the mills in Collyhurst she met a Ukraine man called Stefanos. My gran also lived on Queens Rd, near Cheetham Hill Rd. All the machine shops were in Cheetham Hill in the 20s and 30s, the women often still wore clogs and shawls. They made rain macks, war materials and coats six days a week. They sometimes took work home and worked by candle light for the war effort (for the first and Second World War). Many came from large catholic families. My gran also lived in Price Street in Ancoats.
    Leslie

  • Joseph (Joe) Dawson
    13th February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Hello. Yes, I remember Vernon Street Hightown just off Waterloo Road. My mum had a grocers shop (Dawson’s) next to a taxi company with a fleet of big black old fashioned Austin saloons on one side (Douggies I seem to remember) and Morris the barber on the other mum also had a greengrocers shop at the other end of the street near to where it joined up (passed the croft) with Douglas Street.

    Opposite was a Jewish chippy, Mr Tray the cobbler and a shop selling live maggots to the fishing community… My girl friend at the time was a Miss Beryl Myrtle who I lost touch with. More anon

  • THE PREMIERE CINEMA
    8th February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    There were two streets at the side of The Premiere Cinema in Cheetham Hill. People who lived in those streets got free tickets to go in, as a lot of cars used to park on the streets.

    Eddie

  • Shakespeare Market, Cheetham Hill
    8th February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The Shakespeare Market was on Halliwell Lane, it had all different stalls, such as a butchers, and other stalls, selling second hand books etc. My wife’s mother worked there.
    Eddie

  • HIGH TOWN, 1950s
    8th February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Morris The Barber had a shop in High Town, he was a real character in the area. I used to go there as a kid and When I went in the shop, there was often a large fellow in there called ‘Knocker’ West who used to hang around there. He had played for Manchester United and it was allegedly reported in the newspapers at the time, that he was banned from the game for match fixing. He later tried to prove his innocence but was never allowed to play again. He lived at the top of Vernon Street.
    Eddie

    Note: Enoch James “Knocker” West helped Manchester United win the 1911 league medal. He scored 80 goals in his Manchester United career, his most successful season being the 1911-12 season when he scored a total of 23 goals; 17 in the league and six in the FA Cup. In 1915, he was banned for life by the Football Association, along with three other United players and four Liverpool players after being found guilty of match fixing. West protested his innocence, but his ban was not lifted until 1945. His suspension, which lasted 30 years, was the longest in Football League history. As he was 59 by the time his ban was lifted, he was never involved in football again. West died in 1965, at the age of 79.
    Free The Manchester United One, written by Graham Sharpe, was a book written about Enoch West’s attempts to clear his name in connection with the match-fixing scandal, many years after his death.

  • Coke Street, Cheetham Hill
    25th January 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    There were only a few houses in the area with a garden, and this street was one of them. There was a Pub on the corner called the Horseshoe. I played football with them now and again. It was a Robinson’s Pub, the only one in the area.

    Chris Rowland

  • 'Old' Salford Grammar School
    17th January 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I was a pupil at the ‘Old’ Salford Grammar School at Leaf Square. In 1956 we moved into the ‘new’ school at Claremont, near Buile Hill Park. I recall the school got £300,000 which was a fortune that time. Soon after we moved into new ‘temporary’ classrooms, which were built on top of the two spurs at the front of the building. They were still there when the school was demolished.

    Malcolm Chapman

    • Barry Davidson
      21st January 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I was interested in Malcolm Chapman comments on Leaf Sq and Salford Grammar. I was at Salford Tech when they moved into the Grammar premises soon after the move to Buile Hill. Some of our classes had to be carried out at Hankinson St School due to limited space at that time. The other thing I remember about my time there was during the day some of us used to climb over the back fence and put pennies on the railway lines so that when the train passed over them the pennies were squashed flat ! Happy days !

  • Susan mcconaghie
    12th January 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I went to malborough road salford school in the 1959/1960 which was not a good time due to one male teacher fortunately he left and the rest of the time at the school was great ideas 7 ,at the time

  • I went to Malborough Road School in Salford. I have no photos but remember a teacher a male teacher who left whilst I attended approx 1960 bad memories until he left then I started to enjoy school and lots of good memories I was approx 7 years old

  • SACRED HEART SCHOOL, SALFORD
    23rd December 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The bridge went from the boys playground over the road, to the main part of the school. The railway line was near the main part of the school and the flats were near them. The flats area was called the plaza.
    Martin Ormrod

  • Cheetham Hill Cinemas
    15th December 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The Premiere Cinema was the most expensive cinema to go in. The Globe Cinema was on Thomas Street ( locally known as The Bug Hut)
    Jean Edwards

  • Upholstering in Cheetham HIll
    25th November 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Cheetham Hill being a centre of furniture-making in the 60’s. I used to work there myself for an upholsterers and I remember lots of characters from the area.

    Leslie Darlington

  • St Marks Lane, Cheetham Hill
    17th November 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Our family had an off licence opposite St Marks Church where I lived until I was 11 in 1958 when we moved to Shirley Road. I had a great childhood playing out at every opportunity. The Ennis girls were my friends, we often went to Cheetham Hill Baths, Manley and Brougton Park. Saturday morning cinema at the Shakespeare. Around St Marks Lane was a close community where we knew everyone, the area was mostly demolished along with our shop in the 1960’s. I went to cheetham hill Methodist school on Thomas Street but have no photos of the school. Your site is very interesting and the photographs are great. I do have some family photographs taken outside our shop that show the street but am not sure if I can post them on your site. Regards Pam Worthington

    • Peter Glendinning
      2nd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I lived in a flat at The Grove, Halliwell ln, next to the Swanns greengrocers at the jcn of Tetlow ln, The owner of the shop were my grandparents. I went first to St Marks before going to Thomas st school. I also went to St Marks church and the Church lads brigade. My high school was North Salford.

  • SALFORD SCHOOLS
    6th November 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I lived on Whit Lane, Salford. I went to Wellington Street school on Whit Lane. It eventually closed in 1972 and all the kids then went to Cromwell Secondary Modern school.
    John Catterall

    • Pascale
      11th December 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi, Just wondering how many people will remember my dad. He had the shop on Whit Lane – Bernard’s, during the 1960s. He was very tall. The children called him big Bernie. He sadly passed away September 2015.
      Let me know if you remember him. I’d love to hear from you. Warmest Wishes Pascale

    • Pascale
      11th December 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi, I wrote this 5 minutes ago and I don’t know if it has gone through. Just wondering if anyone remembers my dad. He had a shop on Whit Lane in the 1960s called Bernards. He was a very tall man and the children called him Big Bernie. He sold shoes and clothing. He sadly passed away September 2015. My mum was French ( she had sadly passed away Nov 1981). Anyway, if anyone remembers him, it would be nice to hear from you. Warmest Wishes Pascale

  • Mike, Billy the Mimer Bird
    1st November 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Tom the Grocer on Great Cheetham Street – who I use to clean his shop and Bedford van for ten shillings a week. His wife Laura hated it when he gave the left over vegetables to me for my mother [we lived in Heaton Street] claiming she could still sell them the next day on top of the fresh stock. Tom had a mimer bird named Billy who lived in the shop. He was the attraction of all the customers in them days – the bird – (1960s) but died when Tom’s son repainted the inside of the shop but left the bird in the corner, possibly from the paint fumes. Tom died in 1979. He promised the old van to me … but I never got it. Does anyone else remember Billy the mimer bird? Does anyone have any photos of the old shop?

    • Linda Eastham
      24th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Yes, I remember the talking bird. There were lots of nice shops along Great Cheetham Street East.
      I went to St Andrews RC High school on Tetlow Lane – It would be great to hear from any ex students!

    • Anne Lawler
      1st August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      My goodness I’d forgotten about the miner bird, kept us happy while we waited for mum to be served! 1960’s

  • Bijou Cinema, Salford
    28th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember the Bijou cinema on Broughton Rd, near Lissadel Street in Salford. There were steps going up to the cinema. When we were kids we used to sit on the steps. Pendleton Lads Club was on this site before the Bijou cinema.
    John Catterall

  • The Whit Walks, Salford
    22nd October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I walked in the Whit Walks in about 1950, when I was at St Johns Catholic Cathedral School. We walked from the Cathedral on Chapel Street, up Victoria Street past the Victoria Street Bus Station, along Deansgate where they had a service. You couldn’t move in that place. It was a longer walk home and when we got home we were shattered! On the photo is also Shiela O’Toole, to the left, and Maureen Dardis, or extreme right, and Maureen Smith seen at the back. We all carried fresh flowers and we bought all the dresses new. I was only 15 so I was a bit embarrassed walking in the dress, but you had to do it for the school.
    Gladys Fitzgerald

  • Premiere Cinema, Cheetham Hill
    22nd October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    In 1958 after the Munich air disaster, I collected contributions from the general public in the Premier Cinema for a full week. I recognised the sweet display of the foyer of the cinema straightaway.
    Barry Davidson

    • Anne Lawler
      1st August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I remember the Premier picture house, my parents took me for my 10th birthday, can’t remember what film though!

  • MEMORIES OF SALFORD AND CHEETHAM HILL
    17th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Enjoyed your site reading everybody’s comments, also a couple of names were mentioned that I had forgotten such as father Wright from St.Albans Church, Waterloo road, he was a lovely person.
    I forgot to put my maiden name on the memories I shared which was HARPER and I now live in Australia.
    My parents were brought up in Salford they lived in King William Street before they got married, then moved to Cheetham hill. My father Albert Harper worked for a shirt time at the Queens road bus depot as a conductor, until one day he decided to park the bus for his mate who’s surname was Platt, the only thing was my dad didn’t have a licence and had never driven before, consequently he removed one of the pillows in the depot, ended up being dismissed.
    I remember having a friend cannot remember her name, but her father worked at Strangeways prison, and one day for some reason we delivered eggs to the prison, I remember going inside those huge big doors, on the other side was an office on the left, not sure why we delivered eggs.
    When my godmother moved to Hornby Street nr the prison,
    She had trouble with one if the inmates shining a mirror at the sun and the reflection would be shining in her living room (parlour) she got in touch with the prison and it stopped after that.
    Little snippets keep coming back to me, like the time my godmother told me to put the bread in the bin for her, and me replying said I will take it home, she said no I have told you to put it in the bin, which I did !! Next morning she asked where the bread was, I said in the bin, her reply no it’s not, the penny dropped I had put the bread in the dustbin, and not the bin under the table.
    On another occasion I had to go to I think it was called the Maypole up Bury New road, she asked me to get her egg order which was 2 doz and a few other things, that was ok but I had been given a wooden scooter the previous week, so I went to the shop on that, on the way back home I put the eggs on the handle bar of the scooter which were not in boxes then, needless to say everyone was broke, she was not amused. So I had to do a return trip to the shop minus the scooter to get another egg order.
    When I was 16 I went to work at AEI in Trafford Park also known as Metros they were a very good company to work for happy memories of working there, my mother came from a big family, most of them worked at Metros.
    I also remember going on some Saturday mornings to Grey Mare Lane market I thought it was magical place, then we would go and visit her brother my uncle Richard who still lived in King William Street in Salford. Then we would walk up the main road and have to walk across the Manchester Ship Canal bridge I was petrified I thought the bridge would go up and we would be stuck on it.
    I paid a visit to the Uk 6 years ago, and went around all the old places, my what a change, visited the docks which has been done up looks great now, King William Street is still there but not the houses. Visited Cheetham hill, still have a half sister living there, also my brother Alan lives in Failsworth.
    I also remember a flower lady called Eileen Martin, she use to have a flower shop round the corner from where we lived, then she sold flowers from her barrow on Market Street.
    I want to thank you for putting this site together, reading all the memories of people has rekindle my memories that had been buried. My girlfriend of longstanding put me in touch with the site as she has quite a few memories of her own thank Marjorie Maddisin (Hobson) if anyone reading my comments remembers me I would love to hear from you especially anyone from the Massing Family,
    Muriel Townsend

  • LOWER BROUGHTON, SALFORD
    10th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My aunty had a shop called Pearl’s. It sold hardware, heavy duty brushes, boot polish and bric-a-brac. It was on Lower Broughton Road, Salford.
    Maria Howell

  • LOWER BROUGHTON, SALFORD
    10th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Great Clowes Street Warehouse and Geoff and Steve’s hairdressers. My brother Noel used to take the towels from Geoff and Steve’s to the wash house. I also remember a shop called Wanderley’s near there.
    Joe O’Malley.

    • Linda Eastham
      24th April 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Re: Great Clowes Street Warehouse – I was there when Ken Dodd did the official opening of the store. I am sorry that we did not take any photos.

  • CLARENDON GIRLS SCHOOL, SALFORD, 1961-1965
    10th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember there was a flat there where you learned domestics, where you cooked and you cleaned and everything like that. That was exciting. That was good, i enjoyed that. My sister was there in the year before me and she left as I was going there at the start of 61. My favourite classes were art, music and history. I liked history and the sewing classes.
    Joan Allen

  • ROBERTSON STREET, SALFORD
    4th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The street was off Eccles New Rd, Salford, near Stowell’s School. My father sometimes played the mouth organ at the front door. We had bonfires in the street and the next morning you used to kick every bonfire to see if was still lit. We also had maypoles, which we danced around as children, they were hand made. We also had a rose queen, which were part of the whit walks, part of the big parade.
    Jean Coward

  • ICE CREAM VANS, SALFORD
    4th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    There was a company called Lyons Made on Cross Lane. They sold Ice cream vans to the public when it closed down and alot of Maltese people bought them, families such as the Camilleris, the Velas, the Bulos, etc. Joe Bulo had an icecream van for years. I also bought a van off Lyons, It was the same van as in your photo.

    Steve

  • LOWER BROUGHTON ROAD, SALFORD
    4th October 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Egan’s Fruit and Veg shop on Lower Broughton Rd, I remember the old couple who ran it. My mother came down from Higher Broughton to shop at Mceverley’s Fruit and Veg. She said Lower Broughton was a poorer neighbourhood, so things would be cheaper. I also remember Mandy’s Clothes Shop, The Welsh Stores (they sold babies clothes) and Westons ( they sold jeans and things). Also the chemists and Clarke’s shoes.
    Maria Brabiner

  • Muriel Townsend
    29th September 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I used to live in Agusta street, Cheetham hill, I went to Southall street school, nr Strangeways prison, the headmistress was a Miss Young, and I remember a teacher called miss Warburton I went from the age of about 3 until 8 years old, then I moved to wythenshawe. My godparents were Jewish and they lived in the shop called Marcus, I called my godmother little Joe and her husband big joe, although their real name was Sara Massing and Joseph Massing, her son Merton was my godfather.
    I owe a lot to that family, they cared for me and my mother,
    Sara was at my birth with my mother in Blackpool.
    As I got older I would run errands, light the fires, etc., she would take me up to Smithfield market every Saturday morning for the fish. Sara used to embroider the satin that was laid on the alter in the Cheetham hill road synagogue they were beautiful done, as I got older she would let me have a go at doing a flower on them. She let me borrow the beautiful 5 Books of Moses to take to school during our scripture lessons.
    Although she was Jewish she used to make me go to Sunday school every Sunday at Waterloo road church, she used to work at a factory making coats, think it was called Dani Mac on Waterloo road. When she has to go in the Jewish hospital one time our Minster went to the hospital to see her, there were some raised eyebrows. She had a wonderfull family and friends
    Who were very kind to my family. I remember going to the odeon on Saturday morning for sixpence and the premier and temple picture house. Also remember the school clinic on queens road I was a regular visitor there. I used to love the whit week walks, only time I got new clothes. I also remember the maypole dancing, one time my brother Alan dressed me up and took me down market street singing Molly dancers kicking up a row, I know he collected quite a bit of money, but I didn’t see any !! I remember the PC Tripe shop at the bottom of Cheetham hill road nor the Victoria train station, and playing on the brew as we called it nr Boddingtons brewery, we also had another brewery near our street can’t remember the name but I remember the big horses pulling the carts.
    Also going to Elizabeth park for the day, and passing the derby road skate rink, when they use to clear the ice out we would grab a piece and take it with us for a drink in the way (all those germs) didn’t do us any harm though.
    I could go on and on with my memories but won’t bore you,
    I have to mention the Knowsley pub that was my dads local, we used to sit outside on the wall at weekends and collect our pocket money of him, I used to have to go and shout him on Sunday to tell home dinner was ready.

  • Cross Lane, Salford
    29th September 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    “Exciting, that’s all I can say. There were two big houses. One was a pottery warehouse and one was Luchetti’s Ice Cream. I remember all the shops and all the pubs on Cross Lane, there were that many pubs. I can remember the Herbalists where you could get a hot Vimto and they had little brown tables. If it was cold you could go in there. It was just wonderful really, the market and I had lots of friends around that area.”

    Barbara Kemp

  • Cheetham Hill
    25th September 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Tony Worthington who lived in Japan Street, Cheetham Hill in the 1950s. He learned to dance at Chilterns and later worked on the staff there. He also worked as a Policeman and at Horne Brothers, on Market Street, Manchester, a suit-makers. He was always well dressed.

    Bernard

  • Cheetham Hill Dance Halls
    17th September 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    At the top of Heath Street, Cheetham Hill there was the Betty Whyche School of Dancing. I learned to dance there when I was 9 or 10. My Mum said to my brother “Don’t waste your money on tap dancing, get her to learn ballroom dancing, it will be more useful”. Then we went to Chilterns.

    Marjorie Maddison

  • Family History Forum Comment
    6th September 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    What a great site, keeping our heritage alive. Keep up the great work.

  • Cheetham Hill Memories
    30th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Marjorie Maddison was a regular visitor to The Premiere Cinema, Cheetham Hill. Here are the lyrics to the ABC Minors song……also sung by her in the Oral Histories section on this site……

    Words to The ABC Minors Song

    “We are the boys and girls well known
    As the minors of the ABC
    And every Saturday we line up,
    to see the films we like
    And shout aloud with glee.
    We love to laugh and have a sing song
    Such a happy crowd are we.
    We’re all pals together
    we’re the minors of the ABC”

  • Cheetham Hill Shops, Swimming Baths and Cravenwood Road School
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Woolworths, the Wool Shop, Turners Shoe Shop, The Record Shop, Cheetham Hill Baths and the Supermarket. I also remember the Whit Walks as my Mam used to take me – I wore white shoes and a white frock. I went to Cravenwood Road Primary School, Cheetham Hill. My teacher was a beautiful Indian lady. She was the first Indian lady I’d ever seen – she was tall and beautiful and she wore a Sari.

    Jane Butterworth

  • Browns Butchers, 412 Cheetham Hill Road
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My Father had a butchers at 412 Cheetham Hill Road, called Browns Butchers. We lived above the shop for 15 years until 1963, when the growth of supermarkets put my father out of business. It was near Coombs and W. Meedons Decorators shops (near the corner of Woodlands Road).

    Peter Brown

  • Cooling Towers at Agecroft
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember the Cooling Towers. We lived near the Henry Boddington Pub and we played on the playing fields near them. You could walk from there into the centre of Manchester at that time. As kids we used to climb on the pipes and on the bridges near the industries there.

    Phil Horridge

  • Clarendon School, Salford
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    We went to Clarendon School from 1961 to 1965. We both went to New Windsor school when we were 4, so we’ve been friends now for 62 years. Clarendon School was mixed until they built the Boys School in 1961. They used to have a flat where you learnt to iron and cook – they were preparing us for getting married! We were so excited being in the flat, everything was really modern and it was like being on holiday. We used to learn how to iron handkerchiefs starting with the hem, can you imagine that now!?

    We recognise some of the teachers (POMC00714) Mr Burke and Miss Wolfendon.

    The school streamed us into As, Bs, Cs and D’s. If you were in the A stream you could learn how to type, but if you were in one of the other streams you were told you could work in a factory or at Woolworths. They gave you no confidence. Its all different now.

    Barbera Kemp (nee Walsh) and Joan Allen (nee Paul)

  • Kentons Butchers and Abe Sachs shop
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My mam used to shop on Lower Broughton Road at Kentons Butchers. It was in the supermarket was called C and C and then it became Kwik Save. I went to primary school at the old St. Bonifaces. There was a shop there called Abe Sachs who made suits for the Manchester United footballers. There was a blue Police Box facing the Prince of Wales on the St. Bonifaces side.

    Bridget Cross Curry

  • From Katerineberg to Scotland
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My grand parents came from Katerineberg, Russia. They paid for a passage by boat to New York, but were dropped in Glasgow and told it was New York, around 1910. My Mother was born in Scotland in 1913. My grandfathers name was Mazerowsky and he thought it was foreign sounding so he anglicised it to Moorov. He was a general merchandiser.

    Steve Bloom

  • Grubersik's Newsagent
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Grubersik’s Newsagents near Hope Hospital (Eccles Old Road). It was near our school, Hope High School. Everyone knew the family in the area; there were four sons, all Manchester United fans. The Dad was a Bolton Wanderer’s fan.

    I enjoyed playing Rugby at school, they sometimes brought one of the professional players from Salford Rugby Club to advise us, as the Club was near the school.

    Christopher Stubbs

  • Z. Chernicks Shop, Exchange Street
    20th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My Great Grandfather, Zelig Chernick, was a milkman. He came from Belarus (Kobrin). He lived on Long Millgate, Great Ducie Street, near Empire Street, Cheetham. They had a shop on Exchange Street and they sold cheese, milk, bread and pickles etc. It was called Z. Chernicks. They’d leave a jug outside the house and he drove round with a ladel and urn and measured out the milk for people. My Great Grandmother sold cakes in the shop.

    Denise Stallman

  • Memories of Cheetham Hill
    14th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I went to Temple School, Cheetham Hill from 1963-67, it was a multi faith school. At that time there were 24 different nationalities represented at the school. The school was very disciplined. I also remember the Ice Palace on Derby Street, we practiced in a band there, as my mate worked there in the 1970s. I remember my mam used to go on the Whit Walks and she used to buy clothes for it.
    Tony Myers

  • Ordsall Secondary Modern Boys and Girls School, Salford
    14th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The school’s motto was ‘The Sea.’ There was a large rig from a ship outside the school. After a while they placed a peacock sculpture near the front of the school. The Governors chose between either a small swimming pool or the sculpture and the sculpture was selected.The boys and girls school were across the street from each other, the boys school was opened first and for the first twelve months it was mixed in the early 60s. The school magazine was called ‘The Magpie’.
    George Tapp

  • Whit Walk Memories
    13th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The Whit walks in the 1960s in Manchester would take place upon a weekday Friday in either June or May. It was an early start to get a front row view, there were no seats provided, you just had to make do. The crowd would increase in numbers as it got near to the time. It was a tradition that now is rarely done, but in these days it was popular and being there was fun.The different ages of young and old alike, girls wore long white flowing dresses. It was nice to get bought an ice cream as you watched the Whit pass by. They sold flags and shakers that you could wave as the walkers passed by.
    Judith

  • Migration Memories to Cheetham Hill
    9th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My parents came as part of the European Volunteer Scheme (EVW), from Ukraine at the end of the war. They were brought to near Cambridge, to a displaced people’s camp. Then they settled near Cheetham Hill. My father worked at the Paint factory, near Red Bank and at Ward and Goldstones for years.
    I remember Bata shoes on Cheetham Hill Road, as we used to buy our shoes from there and Levy’s.

    Alex Mitchell with Zenia Mitchell(Serednycka)

  • Hope Hall School
    8th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    “My favourite teacher was Miss Grady, she taught Human Biology. She was just a pleasant woman, very supportive and helpful. She was dictatorial, she didn’t like pupils in the class talking while she was teaching. Every lesson was just fascinating, she made it as easy as possible. she always appreciated it if you stayed behind and helped tidy up. I thought she was the best teacher there.

    The theatre trips were interesting, they went to evening performances at the Library Theatre, and the Royal Exchange trips were good especially with the design of the building. It was a chance to go to the theatre and see drama. And then you got a piece of work to do to describe it. That was my favourite subject, English Literature”, Judith.

  • Clarendon School, Salford
    8th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I went to the school from 1974-79. Mr Fryman our physics teacher got me through the sixteen plus exam, as I missed a portion through illness. My sister told me he was later in the band Simply Red, as she saw him on Top of The Pops wearing a black leather jacket and black quiffed hair.
    Phil Wilson

  • Ordsall Secondary Modern Girls School
    8th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Elaine Crosby (nee Cliff)

    “The first thing you did, you made your pinny and your headband out of the blue and white gingham. Once you made your pinny, then you could do the cooking.

    The Headmistress was called Marjorie Hall. She was tiny, and she was a Quaker. She shouted at you and gave you detention, but she didn’t give you a clout or corporal punishment. She was a little, slight woman and everyone had respect for her. The teachers were nearly all female.”

  • Ice Cream Van, by Judith
    6th August 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Every Sunday it was really a treat,
    when the ice cream van visited our street.
    We would q up in a line for a double treat
    of raspberry ripple lollies and ice cream tubs.
    With 99 chocolate flakes if we were very good,
    with sometimes wafers wrapped in baking paper bags
    which made our Sundays extra special and glad.

    Sometimes we were lucky we would see an ice cream van at Cross Lane, Salford and Eccles Market in the days of the week.
    It was not just Summer but Winter days when ice cream lollies were a delicacy when our Mum brought us a treat from the ice cream van.
    These days its all shops and supermarkets galore
    and Sundays don’t seem the same
    without the ice cream van anymore.

  • I attended King David High school from 1959 to 1966. I recognise several former pupils and teachers. Please correct the name from King David’s to King David .

    • Ashley Myers
      2nd September 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I was at King David High from 1961-1966. I remember all the teachers in the photographs. Ben Kershner, Mr Baker cannot remember his first name, Adrian Allen, Louis Weinstock, Miriam Bluakopf. I started in Sept 1961 so was not there when the photos were taken. Also Mr Cowman workwork

  • ICE CREAM VANS, CHEETHAM HILL
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Noonans Ice Cream, I remember the shape of the vans, it had an Edwardian guilded style decoration. The ice-creams were known by how much they cost – I used to get a ‘threepenny one’ I still remember the tune as he came up the road.

    Blanche

  • Whit Walks, Salford 31st Scout Group
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    When we used to go to the Sea Scouts at night, we did knot making, band practice, on either snare drum or bugle, then we drank stewed tea from the tea urn and had biscuits. It was proper tea made from tea leaves, there was no tea bags then. We would have to be ready for parade on Sunday. We were in the Salford 31st Scout Group and our anthem was called ‘Stevies’. The Whit Walks was a showcase day, it was a day of pride, we marched with four flags at the front, the Navy flag (white enssign), and England flag with 3 lions on, the Fleur de Lys, a French flag, and the other one was the Union Jack flag. The march started at the Boat House about 9am and then went to Albert Square. We used to walk right round and back. It was a very long day. Harold was at the front, in front of the flags, and we were behind. People like Harold Musk, the Scout Master, deserve some recognition.

    Paul Kelly

  • Whit Walks, Salford 31st Scout Group
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Harold Musk’s father was called Lionel and his sister was called Gertrude, they lived in Clement St., Lower Broughton. Eric (his nephew) was a Choir Master at St. Andrews, at the top of Rainsough Brew.

  • Furniture making in Cheetham Hill
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    My Dad was a cabinet maker in Red Bank, Derek Casement. He made bedroom furniture and kitchen furniture, and later classical furniture. Before then, he worked at the Co-op, building the CIS, on the wooden panelling in the 1950s. He also did all the display cabinets for the Manchester Museum. Salford University filmed him in his workshop on Bolton Road, and made a film of him.

  • Pooles Chippy, Higher Broughton
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Pooles Chippy on Leicester Road, owned by Tommy Poole. When you got chips with your parents, he used to wrap one in newspaper for the kids.

    Ian Casement

    • craig
      29th November 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Comment Category: General memories

      I also remember Pooles chippy, they had a chow dog. We used to take a big dish up to the shop on a Friday to put the puddings in. We lived on Welbeck Grove.

  • Girl Guides at the Whit Walks, Cheetham Hill
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Olwyn Casement (nee Hurst) shared her memories of the Whit Walks that she took part in as a Girl Guide. She recognied herself and her friends in three photographs;

    “We were in Marlborough Road Methodist Guides and I went to Marlborough Road School. All the girls in the photo (PMC13017 and PMC13016) were in the Guides together for about 5 years, from when we were 11 until we were about 15. We all went away together to a Girls Friendly Society in Morecombe. The Leifetenant (the front right PMC13016) was called Mrs Norris, and her sister (on the left) Miss Bates, was the Captain. Jean McGinty, (PMC13017, behind the leader) was the daughter of a well known chucker-outerer at the Devonshire Picture House! It’s not there now”.

    Olwyn identified (from the left) Shirley Prince (Olwyns friend), Rita Cowey, Brenda Keyes, Alma, Mrs Norris, Jean McGinty, Jean Hughes, Olwyn Hurst, Doreen Brown and Elsie Voyce (PMC13017).

  • Lorenzinis, Cohen and Wilks
    30th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Marjorie Bowker, from Newton Le Willows, shared her memories of being a child in Cheetham Hill, when she visited our exhibition;

    “We used to go to Lorenzinis every Sunday after church at St. Mathews.
    I always used to order Vimto.

    My Dad worked as a forman cutter at a mac factory, Cohen and Wilks, on Derby Street. He got a promotion as a Factory Manager in Newton Le Willows after that, so we moved away”.

    • COHEN AND WILKS
      22nd February 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      My grandmother worked there all her working life as a mackintosh machinist. Christina Williamson. Wonder if your dad knew her 🙂
      Jude

  • Cromwell Girls
    25th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Paul Blain identified his friend Janice Fitzsimons on a Cromwell Girls school photograph and she’s confirmed it:

    “Yes I’m the dark haired girl on the left. I was also on the museums postcards years ago as i worked in the library. They were in Larkhill Place I was posting a letter outside Madame Louisa’s shop”

  • Leicester Road
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I went to St Andrew’s on Leicester road, have great memories of the Jewish community of the area. Playing in Manley park.

    • Barry Davidson
      21st January 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I too remember playing in Mandley Park as a kid. I went to Cheetham Hill Methodist School better known as Thomas St school. It was a multi-racial school and I was one of a large number of Jewish children there in the early 50’s. I do not remember ever experiencing any anti-semitism at school even though there were fights over other stupid things. I lived in George St at the Junction with Coke St. The streets in those days looked enormously long but as I go back around there these days they now look tiny! I remember Lorenzini’s and Macky Davis the barbers. I used to deliver papers for the newsagents on King Edward Buildings. It enabled me to buy my first bike called Ace of Spades as my weekly wage paid the weekly payment on the bike. My dad paid the £1 deposit !

      • Pam Fearn
        31st March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

        I went to Thomas Street school l think 1952 would have been my starting year, (my parents had the off licence on the corner of St Marks Lane and Coke Street). I really loved the school and got along well with my studies, my parents were persuaded when I was eight to send me to a small private school called Cheetham Collegete off Waterloo Road. I’m not sure what prompted the move and I don’t think my parents appreciated how good Thomas Street school was, my new school was a disaster for me where I was teased for my strong accent etc and the school teaching methods did not work for me. Also my poor Dad must have struggled to pay the fees thinking he was doing his best for me. I have great memories of Thomas Street School and wish I had some photographs of the school. Pam Fearn

      • Glo McNeill
        6th August 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

        I went to Thomas St. Methodist from 1935 – 1939. There was a sweet shop opposite the school with a Ha’penny Tray or for the rich, a Penny Tray sweet selection. At the corner of Thomas Street and Cheetham Hill Road was Smith’s Scottish Bakery,. I remember before Woolworth’s was built, the site was a huge old Victorian mansion, and we kids played on the broken walls and in the ‘haunted rooms’. there were also empty houses on George Street where we used to play.

  • Ordsall High
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Marie Cash, at Salford Museum and Art Gallery told us about:

    “I did my Art and Design foundation course in the old Ordsall High school building, which became Salford Technical College, from 1987 to 1989. When the High School became empty the College Art Department moved in there. We had the run of the whole school. All the gym equipment was still in there, and we use to go in swinging off the ropes. My Aunty lived across the road on Craven Drive and we had to go to her house every Tuesday. I could take one friend with me and the menu was always either egg and chips or corned beef hash. I hate fried eggs and I never told her for two years, I used to make my mate eat it. On the way back to college she used to give us a stale biscuit. If for any reason I never turned up she used to come into the college with her poodle looking for me. Her name was Jean, and my middle name was Jean.

  • Clarendon School
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Christine Allmark at Salford Museum and Art Gallery, told us about;

    “Beryl Murray was a teacher at Clarendon School. She would know all the teachers in the staff room. She’s 90 now and she’s still as bright as a button, and she would love to tell you her memories. I can’t wait to tell her”.

  • Cooling Towers at Agecroft
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Blanche, at Salford Museum and Art Gallery told us about the cooling towers:

    “The two towers on the right were the original ones, you can tell by the ’embroidery’ decoration around the top. I watched the other two being built. We lived in Agecroft Road West, and you could see them from there and the chimney.”

  • The Four Pennies at Alan Powels Barber Shop
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Gerry Stone, visiting the Salford Museum and Art Gallery, told us about the barber shop photograph.

    “That’s my brother! Alan Goldstone. And these were the Four Pennies (wearing gowns). They did very well at the time. They did ‘Juliet’ and ‘Until Its Time For You To Go’. This was at a famous barbers called Alan Powels, on Amber Street, off Shude Hill, who had lots of famous footballers as clients. Alan Lewis (third on the right at the back) was their manager. He was also a car dealer and later became an MP in Yorkshire. The one of the far right was Danny Brown, he was a trainee.”

  • Cohen and Wilks textiles factory
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Judith Redfern, visiting the Salford Museum and Art Gallery, told us about the textile factory photographs.

    “This looks like Cohen and Wilkes, Cheetham Hill. My Grandmother, Christina Williamson was a Macintosh machinist, making what you call “Macs’. She lived in Hightown, on Pemberton Street.”

    • That brought back a memory some years ago a friends mum told me she worked there with my grandpa mum and aunty mum was about 18 she said.There name was Margolis.
      Jackie Harrison.

  • St. Lawrences RC School
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Maria Barlow, visiting the Salford Museum and Art Gallery, told us she went to St. Lawrence’s school.

    “We went to a school re-union about 2 years ago, when we were all about 50, all of us who finished in ’81. Just after the re-union we all went to each others 50th parties. We’ve had some good memories and some good times since. I’ve seen people I haven’t seen for 32 years. Since then about 20 to 30 of us go out regularly, we try and do it about once a month.
    The school looks exactly the same as it was. And when my son went there it still looked the same. It became Our Lady of St. Carmel and then All Hallows. It was demolished a couple of years. We watched it being demolished.”

  • Cromwell School
    23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Fred Windsor, visiting the exhibition, Salford Museum and Art Gallery.

    “There were two different buildings at Cromwell School, the Boys and the Girls School. I went from ’68 to ’72. I remember the ceramic freeze on the side of the school – we didn’t know what it signified or represented – was it Inka? Was it Egyptian? No-one seemed to know”

  • Memories of Cheetham Hill
    8th July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Brilliant site which brought back fond memories of happy times in Cheetham during the 40s and 50s. I hope the following will be of help to you in your project.
    Page 16 PMC08041 St. Albans Cheetwood Rose Queen Crowning. Rectory Gardens Waterloo Road Father Harold Wright presiding. Page 17 as above.
    PMC 1800 St Albans Annual Patronal Festival Walk of witness. Father Wright and servers leaving Parish Hall on Barrow Hill Road to Walk the Parish boundaries as follows onto Waterloo Road,Marlborough Road, St.James Road,Great Cheetham Street East, Bury New Road, Waterloo Road and back to Church.

    PMC 18010 St. Albans Church Choir with Organist/Choirmaster Mr. Haslam.

    PMF04001 TO PMF04022
    Childrens Xmas Party for families of Prison Officers serving at HMP Manchester Strangeways held in the Prison Officers Social Club on Southall Street Cheetham.

    PMG 14019 Looking down Waterloo Road from Cheetham Hill Road. Extreme right Cheetham Cricket Club Ground.

    PMH 14046 Ford Zephyr Car parked on Halliwell Lane.

    PMI 07036 Alderman Abraham Moss, Chairman Manchester Education Committee, opening the new King Davids High School off Cheetham Hill Road, following the closure of the Jewish Secondary School on Waterloo Road, Cheetham.

    POML 02109 Corner of Waterloo Road and Bury New Road. Shop on left, “Issy Wise the Barber” a much respected and well liked character in the area. I believe his son,David, emigrated to New York and established a very successful Hair Salon.

    POML 03126 Left is GPO Telecommunications Tower and to the right Manchester Police Radio Mast and extreme right the former Manchester Parks Police Radio Mast.

    POML 06606A Looking across the Irk River Valley from Queens Road to Collyhurst.

    • Gail
      23rd July 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi Barrie,
      thanks so much for all that information, we’ll add it to the records.
      I wonder what happened to the hair Salon in Australia and if its still going?
      Very best wishes, Gail

  • Woolworths, Cheetham Hill
    22nd June 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    I remember Woolworths on Cheetham Hill really well. It was still really popular in the early 1980s. I used to go in to buy records. The whole of Cheetham Hill Road was full of independent shops. We used to go from Higher Broughton – it was our main shopping street.
    Lawrence Cassidy

    • i remember woolworths as i used to go in there at dinner times from school,as i used to go to St Marks heath street primary school.then i got a sat job there doing warehouse work.i also had a paperround right opposite woolworths but i cant remember the name of the papershop.

    • I worked next door to the record shop in Cheetham Hill it was a gown shop called Rae’s of Chester in the 80’s.and
      some years later at Wise Chemist near Woolworths.
      JackieHarrison.

  • Portrait of Muriel Tow
    15th June 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    There is also a portrait photo on page 233 Pom30232B. This is my cousin her name is Muriel Tow. She lived in Marsland St off Marlborough Rd. Not sure how old she is there. I haven,t seen her in many years, she would be around mid 70s now. Her Dad was Sam Tow, and Hilda his wife, muriel,s mum died in her early 40s. Muriel,s sister cousin Phyllis died early after giving birth to a son, The family moved away afterwards, so no contact since. Regards carole mccannon.

  • Whit Walks, Cheetham Hill
    15th June 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    Hy, the photo of whit walks page 7 of 18. pmc13007 june 1951 shows me in the centre of the line with the white glove on. I would be aged 4yrs 6months at the time. I do have a copy of this photo, and another with my sister on dudley st taken near the mission on dudley st both in the dresses my mother made at the time. We lived charlotte st at the time moving to dudley st when i was aged 10yrs old. These photo,s were in a collection which my dad took. He passed 2005 Mum passed 2013. I think your doing a fabulous job in what your doing. Regards carole mccannon (name still same).

    • Gail
      27th June 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi Carole, thanks for the information about you in the Whit Walks photo, it really helps us build a picture of the collection. Thanks for your encouragement too!
      Hope you enjoy browsing the website, best wishes Gail

  • Broughton High School
    15th June 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

    The photographs in the collection that are called “Salford Girls High” are actually of Broughton High School for Girls, where I was a pupil from 1965 to 1972.

    • Gail
      27th June 2016 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Hi Alwyn!
      thanks for your info spotting the school names! That’s what we hoped would happen when we put the photos on line – we don’t have a lot of information, and
      were not sure what we’ve got is accurate anyway, so its good to know we can change it. Do you recognise anyone in the photos? I’ll get them re-labelled for you tomorrow.
      Best regards Gail

    • I went to broughton high school in the 1970 I was Diane reinersten then had a friend name Karen Jessop in Salford

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